Gratz Scholars Program

The Gratz College Scholars Program is for adults in the community who enjoy learning in an intellectual atmosphere with instructors who are highly regarded experts in their fields. Ongoing courses are offered each semester in a variety of subjects and topics as well as Hebrew and Yiddish language. The Scholars Program also sponsors Distinguished Lecture Series, Yiddish programs, Israeli films and other special events.

Online Registration
Mail-In Registration

Registration/Refund Policy

Minimum class size required to run each course. Full tuition payment is due upon registration prior to the start of the first class.  If a cancellation is received at least two days before the course begins, 100% of tuition will be refunded.


Summer 2019 Continuing Education

 

How the World Changed Judaism
Dr. Saul Wachs
June 3 – 6
Monday - Thursday, 10 am - 12 pm
4 sessions

While some would argue that Judaism has never changed, the facts are otherwise. The beliefs and practices that bind Jews together have been affected, sometimes significantly as we moved from segregated and/or ghetto-sized communities into the open society. This has been both a source  of blessing and challenge. We will examine the changes that took place in Europe and in North America that form the background for today's Jewish world and analyze the responses of Jewish leadership to these opportunities and challenges.
$125
 

Jewish Ethics
Rabbi Ian Shaffer
June 24 - 27
Monday - Thursday, 10 am - 12 pm
4 sessions

Why are we ethical or moral? Does freedom of choice really exist? Does Judaism guide us in matters of business and medical ethics? What is the basic Jewish view of human dignity, and how is it challenged by social media 'public shaming' and other online behaviors? These questions and others about Jewish ethics and philosophical issues will be discussed using provided texts in each class. No Hebrew skills are required.
$125
 

“’My Yiddishe Mama’: East European Immigrant Jewish Family Life in America”
Dr. Reena Sigman Friedman
July 8 - 11
Monday - Thursday, 10 am - 12 pm
4 sessions

Using primary source documents, music, film and other visuals, this course explores the dynamics of immigrant Jewish family life in America. It focuses on the significant challenges that family separation, difficult living and working conditions and cultural adjustment posed to family solidarity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We will discuss the ways in which family members, as well as Jewish organizations, coped with these challenges as the immigrants accommodated to American life.
$125
 

Four Lesser Known Books of the Bible
Dr. Joseph Davis
July 22 - 25
Monday - Thursday, 10 am - 12 pm
4 sessions

This class will study four lesser known books of the Bible: Job, Daniel, Ezra-Nehemiah, and Chronicles. Although they are not read in synagogue, they are each fascinating books in their own right, and form an important section of the bible.
$125
 

The Problem of Slavery in World Culture from the Book of Genesis to Isis
Dr. Paul Finkelman
July 29 – August 1
Monday - Thursday, 10 am - 12 pm
4 sessions

Slavery has been a universal human institution from earliest recorded history to today’s newspapers. Join Professor Finkelman as we explore this sad, and unfortunately, timely phenomenon.
$125
 

Zionism in America Today
Dr. Asaf Romirowsky
August 5 - 8
Monday - Thursday, 10 am - 12 pm
4 sessions

Anti-Jewish sentiment goes by many names, including anti-Judaism, Jew-hatred, Judeophobia, and, of course, Antisemitism – a term that was coined in 1879 to give scientific legitimacy to the “longest hatred.” This course will explore the ancient origins of Jew-hatred, examining its development and transformation in the course of the past two millennia, paying particular attention to the shifting theological, ideological, cultural, political and scientific trends that impacted the perception of Jews and Judaism in the modern period.

This course considers one of the oldest and most persistent forms of hatred. What is antisemitism? How is it part of the family of bigotries, prejudice and discrimination, and how is it unique? Is it more bigotry or ideology? How has it manifested itself in different eras, regions, political and economic systems and culture? How is it defined? What different types are there? Is anti-Zionism antisemitism? Why does it exist in some countries which do not even have Jews? How can it be combated? At the end of the course, students should be able to identify and differentiate different types of antisemitism, understand how antisemitism works (and changes) as an ideology, how historical and socio-economic factors do and do not impact it, and how it fits within (but is also different from other members of) the family of bigotries
$125

 

For more information or to register for classes, please contact Hope Matles at 215-635-7300 x172 or at [email protected].