Course Offerings

Courses

A

This course explores a difficult, complex and emotionally charged subject: the American response to the Holocaust. While most historians agree that the nation’s response was inadequate, and that a more forceful and effective rescue policy might have saved many lives, they disagree about what was...

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Semester: Spring B: February 27- April 23

B

This is an introduction to the unique civilization that Jews built in the lands of Eastern Europe, a civilization from which nearly all American and European Jews and half of all Israeli Jews are descended, and which the Nazis devoted particular fury to destroying. The course will begin with the...

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Semester: Traditional Semester: January 2 – April 23

C

The Polish-Jewish scholar Raphael Lemkin coined the term "genocide" in 1944. This class will explore the meaning of this term and specific instances of genocides throughout history in an effort to understand how and why genocides occur. Our focal point is the Holocaust, the mass murder of...

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Semester: Spring B: February 27- April 23

F

Though often studied as stand-alone events, the Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust have a fascinating and frightening relationship to each other. By exploring the basic facts and the critical issues associated with each genocide, we will seek to determine what they have in common, how they...

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Semester: Summer A: April 24 – June 18, 2018

G

The 1948 United Nations Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide promised to “liberate mankind from [the] odious scourge” of genocide, but thus far the international community has failed to deliver. Our course will examine the many different aspects involved with...

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Semester: Summer B: June 19 – August 13, 2018

J

This course explores the common roots of ancient Rabbinic Judaism and early Christianity in the first five centuries CE. We study both the theological similarities between the two movements and the ways in which they developed into distinctly different religious traditions. Topics to be covered...

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Semester: Fall A: August 22-October 16

L

This is a survey of the vast literature that has arisen in response to the Holocaust. We will begin with excerpts from ghetto and camp diaries, writing that grapples with events as they are happening. We will spend the bulk of the course, however, reading a small selection of the fiction and...

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Semester: Traditional Semester: January 2 – April 23

M

This non-credit course is designed to assist students as they prepare their final thesis or project. It will discuss expectations for format and approach as well as provide guidance for research methods and identify milestones students should be striving for in terms of timelines.

Semester: Traditional Semester: January 2 – April 23

The 3-credit final project is a more practical approach to exploring and presenting applied research on a particular topic in the field of Holocaust and Genocide Studies. It must be completed under the guidance of an advisor. It offers the student an opportunity to explore a topic making use of...

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Semester: Traditional Semester: January 2 – April 23

The 3-credit final project is a more practical approach to exploring and presenting applied research on a particular topic in the field of Holocaust and Genocide Studies. It must be completed under the guidance of an advisor. It offers the student an opportunity to explore a topic making use of...

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Semester: Full Summer: April 24 – August 13, 2018

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