Curriculum Map - Holocaust and Genocide Studies | Gratz College

Curriculum Map - Holocaust and Genocide Studies

 

All courses are three credits, unless otherwise noted.

Graduate Certificate (18 credits)

  • Required Core (6 credits)
  • Electives (12 credits)
  • HGS 510: The Holocaust and European Mass Murder
  • HGS 557: Comparative Genocide

Choose 4 of the following courses:

  • HGS 503: Women and the Holocaust
  • HGS 507: Their Brother’s Keepers: Rescuers and Righteous Gentiles
  • HGS 511: History of Antisemitism
  • HGS 512: Teaching the Holocaust
  • HGS 517: Resistance in the Holocaust
  • HGS 522: Children of the Nazi Era
  • HGS 523: The Holocaust and Genocide in Film
  • HGS 524: Transcending Trauma: The Psychosocial Impact of the Holocaust on Survivor Families
  • HGS 525: Post-Holocaust Theology
  • HGS 526: Nazi Germany and Corporate Collaboration
  • HGS 527: Native American Genocides
  • HGS 533: Before Hitler: East European Jewish Civilization
  • HGS 535: Literature of the Holocaust
  • HGS 537: Holocaust Historiography
  • HGS 541: From Armenia to Auschwitz: An Examination of the First Modern Genocides
  • HGS 554: The Warsaw Ghetto
  • HGS 555: The Holocaust and Memory
  • HGS 556: Genocide Prevention
  • HGS 558: Gender and Genocide in the 20th Century
  • HGS 560: America’s Response to the Holocaust
  • HGS 562: The Church and the Holocaust
  • HGS 596: Independent Study –Travel*
  • HGS 610: The Cambodian Genocide
  • HGS 632: Jews and Germany: Rise, Fall and Rebirth
  • HGS 633: Loss and Renewal: The Aftermath of the Holocaust
  • HGS 634: Hitler’s Other Victims
  • JST 515: The Problem of Evil: The Jewish Response (cross-listed)
  • JST 615: Judaism and Christianity (cross-listed)

*The Holocaust and Genocide Studies Independent Study-Travel course, HGS 596, is a 3 credit graduate course. Tuition is paid like any other course. Students need to submit a request to the Registrar to register for HGS 596 as they cannot register themselves. Students may request registration once they have been accepted to an approved travel-study program and have received permission from the program director/advisor. Students must provide proof of participation in the trip, such as a letter from the program organizers, as well as a detailed itinerary. The trip should be Holocaust/Genocide related and be a destination outside of the United States. Common destinations are Eastern Europe and Yad Vashem seminars in Israel. To earn graduate credit, students must keep a daily log of sites visited, learning experiences, impressions and reflections to be turned in to an appointed professor. The log should be approximately one typed page per day. At the master's level, students must also write a 20-page research paper on a topic relevant to the trip, which must be approved by the appointed professor. The paper and log are due no later than the end of the summer session B. (Most approved programs are run in the summer.) Students may take only one international trip to be used toward credit in the Holocaust and Genocide Studies program.

 

All courses are three credits, unless otherwise noted.

Master of Arts (36 credits)

  • Required Core (6 credits)
  • Electives (24-27 credits)
    • The number of required courses is dependent on whether a student chooses to complete a Final Project or Thesis.
  • Final Project (3 credits) or Thesis (6 credits)
  • HGS 510: The Holocaust and European Mass Murder
  • HGS 557: Comparative Genocide

Choose 8 or 9 of the following courses:

  • HGS 503: Women and the Holocaust
  • HGS 507: Their Brother’s Keepers: Rescuers and Righteous Gentiles
  • HGS 511: History of Antisemitism
  • HGS 512: Teaching the Holocaust
  • HGS 517: Resistance in the Holocaust
  • HGS 522: Children of the Nazi Era
  • HGS 523: The Holocaust and Genocide in Film
  • HGS 524: Transcending Trauma: The Psychosocial Impact of the Holocaust on Survivor Families
  • HGS 525: Post-Holocaust Theology
  • HGS 526: Nazi Germany and Corporate Collaboration
  • HGS 527: Native American Genocides
  • HGS 533: Before Hitler: East European Jewish Civilization
  • HGS 535: Literature of the Holocaust
  • HGS 537: Holocaust Historiography
  • HGS 541: From Armenia to Auschwitz: An Examination of the First Modern Genocides
  • HGS 554: The Warsaw Ghetto
  • HGS 555: The Holocaust and Memory
  • HGS 556: Genocide Prevention
  • HGS 558: Gender and Genocide in the 20th Century
  • HGS 560: America’s Response to the Holocaust
  • HGS 562: The Church and the Holocaust
  • HGS 596: Independent Study –Travel*
  • HGS 610: The Cambodian Genocide
  • HGS 632: Jews and Germany: Rise, Fall and Rebirth
  • HGS 633: Loss and Renewal: The Aftermath of the Holocaust
  • HGS 634: Hitler’s Other Victims
  • JST 515: The Problem of Evil: The Jewish Response (cross-listed)
  • JST 615: Judaism and Christianity (cross-listed)

*The Holocaust and Genocide Studies Independent Study-Travel course, HGS 596, is a 3 credit graduate course. Tuition is paid like any other course. Students need to submit a request to the Registrar to register for HGS 596 as they cannot register themselves. Students may request registration once they have been accepted to an approved travel-study program and have received permission from the program director/advisor. Students must provide proof of participation in the trip, such as a letter from the program organizers, as well as a detailed itinerary. The trip should be Holocaust/Genocide related and be a destination outside of the United States. Common destinations are Eastern Europe and Yad Vashem seminars in Israel. To earn graduate credit, students must keep a daily log of sites visited, learning experiences, impressions and reflections to be turned in to an appointed professor. The log should be approximately one typed page per day. At the master's level, students must also write a 20-page research paper on a topic relevant to the trip, which must be approved by the appointed professor. The paper and log are due no later than the end of the summer session B. (Most approved programs are run in the summer.) Students may take only one international trip to be used toward credit in the Holocaust and Genocide Studies program.

  • HGS 597: Thesis/Project Seminar (non-credit)
  • Choose one of the following:
    • HGS 598: Master’s Thesis (6 credits)
    • HGS 599: Master’s Final Project (3 credits)

 

All courses are three credits, unless otherwise noted.

Note: No transfer courses will be accepted at the Doctoral level.

Doctorate (Ph.D.) (48 credits)

  • Required Core (9 credits)
  • Electives (24 credits)
  • Required Summer Residencies at Summer Institute (9 credits)
  • Seminar Dissertation Preparation (6 credits)
  • Foreign Language

 

  • HGS 700: Unveiling the Underpinnings of Genocide
  • HGS 723: Genocide in the Modern World
  • HGS 737: Holocaust Historiography  
Choose 8 of the following courses: 
  • HGS 703: Women in the Holocaust
  • HGS 708: Balkan Genocides in the Twentieth Century
  • HGS 711: History of Antisemitism
  • HGS 717: Resistance in the Holocaust
  • HGS 722: Gender and Genocide II
  • HGS 724: Holocaust, Genocide and International Law
  • HGS 725: A Geographical Approach to the Study of the Holocaust
  • HGS 726: The Psychology and Sociology of Altruism and Rescue
  • HGS 727: Post-Holocaust Theologies
  • HGS 728 : The Role of Muslims and the Holocaust
  • HGS 733: Loss and Renewal: The Aftermath of the Holocaust
  • HGS 754: The Warsaw Ghetto
  • HGS 756: Genocide Prevention
  • HGS 757: Rwanda's Genocide and its Legacies
  • HGS 759: The Holodomor
  • HGS 760: America's Response to the Holocaust
  • HGS 762: The Church and the Holocaust
  • HGS 763: The Holocaust and Ethical Reasoning
  • HGS 796: Independent Study –Travel

among others…

  • Summer 1 - HGS 704/705:  Orientation, Doctoral Writing & Research Seminar
    • This course should be taken during the first summer of the program as soon as possible after students enroll
  • Summer 2 - Any approved Holocaust and Genocide Studies doctoral elective at Summer Institute
  • Summer 3 - Any approved Holocaust and Genocide Studies docotral elective at Summer Institute and the non-credit Proposal Workshop

Students will be expected to demonstrate reading and research proficiency in the language(s) necessary for their research and dissertation. 

Three comprehensive exams (on the Holocaust, the other modern genocides, and the student's dissertation area) may be taken upon completion of doctoral course requirements. Students who elect to take "Comps" to increase their competitiveness in the academic market should contact the Program Director to discuss preparation and scheduling. Comps are non-credit examinations but they will be listed with grades on the student's transcript if the student decides to take them. *Additional fees apply.*

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